Daily Archives: April 23, 2009

Birthday present from The Evening Standard

The Evening Standard in London celebrated Shakespeare’s birthday with a short story on Sir Derek Jacobi’s faith in Oxford as the author of the works by William Shakespeare — “Shakespeare did not write his own plays, claims Sir Derek Jacobi”.

One commentator suggested a new Stratfordian response to the authorship question:

Most of the plays are just trash that nobody would want to be thought of as writing anyway, U am glad he doesn’t get the blame any more. Keith Price, Luton, England

May 30 Shakespeare symposium in Watertown, MA

Alex McNeil, Bonner Miller Cutting, Mark Anderson, Marie Merkel and Bill Boyle will speak at a symposium held from 9:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. May 30 at the Watertown Free Public Library, 123 Main St., Watertown Square, MA. A $10 donation is requested to help defray costs including lunch on the day of the event. On the evening before the symposium Hank Whittemore will perform Shake-speare’s Treason at 7 p.m. May 29 at the First Parish of Watertown Unitarian Universalist Church for a suggested donation of $10, students may attend free.

The Saturday event is titled “A Symposium: Shakespeare from the Oxfordian Perspective” and was organized by several of the presenters and others among a group of Oxfordians who live in the Boston area.

Bonner Cutting will speak about Shakespeare’s Will, Mark Anderson will talk about the Cobbe Portrait, Marie Merkel will discuss Ben Jonson & The Tempest, Bill Boyle will talk about the succession crisis in the 1590s, and Alex McNeil will act as master of ceremonies and games-master.

For information, contact the Shakespeare Symposium at info@shakespearesymposium.org or call 617-955-3198.

SOS newsletter guidelines

The newsletter prints content emphasizing the publication of scholarly articles related to the case for Edward deVere, Seventeenth Earl of Oxford, as the true author of the Shakespeare canon while also reaching out to authors and scholars who may submit articles about a range of subjects that touch on the Shakespeare authorship question more broadly.

Submit copy to: linda.theil@gmail.com.

Deadlines: Submit articles two months before publication deadlines of June, Sept, Dec, March. Submit news one month before publication date. Submit 500 word blog entries pertaining to your article and news items any time.
Content guidelines: News 500 words – specifics including accurate titles, contacts, links, etc. Features 1-3K words
Photos/graphics: include cutlines saying names of all in photo and circumstance: who, when, what, where?
Ongoing: books, CD and DVD reviews 300 words; travel 500 words

Blog entries: Anyone can submit a blog entry on any topic at any time. Keep to around 500 words and include links and references — who, what, where, when, how, & why. Blog great performances, great books, great websites, great insights, whatever tickles your Oxfordian fancy.

Preparing a manuscript:
· DO NOT justify text
· DO NOT double space between sentences
· DO NOT indent; double space between paragraphs
· DO NOT use quotations around anything that is not a direct quote, except names of poems and stories are set in quotes
· DO NOT use quotations for partial quotes — if it’s not a sentence, paraphrase and attribute.
· If you have a block quote, set it even with the margin in italics – the typesetter will set it as a block quote.
· Names of books and plays are always italicized, do not use single or double quotes around names of books or plays.
· Scholarly articles are referenced using Modern Language Association style.

In general:
· Try to keep sentences no longer than ten words. If you need more words, clarify the thought and make more sentences.
· If you find yourself using semi-colons, consider making two sentences instead.
· If you find yourself with a sentence full of commas, consider alternative phrasing — except in the case of a series, and even then don’t make the series interminable.
· Do not use empty phrases like in fact.
· Italicize foreign words and phrases, and words used in unusual ways – do not italicize anything else (except block quotes).
· Don’t start a sentence with the word, it. Substitute whatever it is that IT is. Look askance at every IT.
· Avoid any form of the verb, to be; find a more precise action whenever possible.
· Study Strunk and White — The Elements of Style – you can’t go wrong.
· Read your copy out loud before submitting it – if you can’t speak it, they can’t read it.
· Pretend you’re trying to explain your topic to a very smart nine-year-old.