Monthly Archives: March 2011

Famed Shakespearean Actor Reads the “Declaration of Reasonable Doubt About the Identity of William Shakespeare”

I’m delighted to be able to pass along this bit of news.  I just happened to notice this recently and I found it to be a special treat.  Visitors to the Shakespeare Authorship Coalition’s website can now listen to famed Shakespearean actor Michael York read the text of the “Declaration of Reasonable Doubt About the Identity of William Shakespeare.”  Yes it’s easy enough to read the Declaration yourself, but it really is enjoyable to listen to Michael York’s rendering of the Declaration.  Well worth the investment of less than 30 minutes.

So go ahead.  Click on the link below.  Once you’re on the SAC’s homepage, simply follow instructions and click on the play button and you’ll immediately begin listening to Michael York’s distinctive voice.  I’m sure you’ll enjoy listening and learning.  Matthew

http://doubtaboutwill.org/declaration_with_audio

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In First Folio, a New Novel by Scott Evans, the 17th Earl of Oxford Emerges As The Author of The “Shakespeare” Works

Below are some excerpts from an article in the local newspaper in Davis, CA — the Davis Enterprise.  Click HERE to read the entire article.  Congrats to Scott Evans on his new novel!  Note the info below about a Meet The Author event in Davis on March 18th.  Matthew
Davis Enterprise | Thursday, March 10th, 2011 | Posted by Chloe Kim
So, was Shakespeare a fraud?

Davis author Scott Evans' new novel,               "First Folio," is set partially in his hometown.               The literary mystery should appeal to fans of "The Da               Vinci Code," Evans says. Wayne Tilcock/Enterprise               photo

Davis author Scott Evans’ new novel, “First Folio,” is set partially in his hometown. The literary mystery should appeal to fans of “The Da Vinci Code,” Evans says. Wayne Tilcock/Enterprise photo

In Scott Evans’ new novel, “First Folio,” priceless handwritten manuscripts reveal that the most famous writer in the world — William Shakespeare — was a fraud, and that the true author of Shakespeare’s iconic plays actually was Edward de Vere, the 17th Earl of Oxford.

The book is fiction, and the Bard hasn’t really been officially dethroned. But other than that, and “the fact that Joe (the main character) receives handwritten documents, which don’t exist, all other factual information is well-researched and true,” said Evans, a Davis author.

“There are few samples of Shakespeare’s handwriting, all of which are signatures on legal documents. The handwriting is pretty halting and poor. It doesn’t look like something an experienced writer would produce,” Evans said.

Evans explores this conundrum in “First Folio,” a literary mystery that he says fans of “The Da Vinci Code” will enjoy.

The main character is Joe Conrad, a professor at the fictional Central Lutheran University in Stockton, who lives in Davis. His mentor, Jack Claire, finds what seem to be authentic handwritten manuscripts of Shakespeare’s plays, along with a leather-bound copy of the First Folio, the first collection of Shakespeare’s plays.

[SNIP]

Local residents can meet him at 3 p.m. Sunday at Atria Covell Gardens, 1111 Alvarado Ave. in Davis. Bistro 33, 226 F St., also will host a reading and reception from 7 to 9 p.m. Friday, March 18, and Evans will be at The Avid Reader, 617 Second St., at 7:30 p.m. Friday, March 25.

Meet the author

Who: Scott Evans, author of “First Folio”

When: 3 p.m. Sunday

Where: Atria Covell Gardens, 1111 Alvarado Ave., Davis

From The Oxfordian: Excellent Article Summarizing the Case for Oxford as Shakespeare Now Available Online

This excellent article, written by longtime Shakespeare Oxford Society member Ramon Jiménez, is must reading for anybody with an interest in Shakespeare generally and the Shakespeare Authorship Question in particular.  I’m pasting below a few of paragraphs from Ramon’s compelling article. A link is provided below so you can read the entire article which was recently posted on the Shakespeare Oxford Society’s website:

The Case for Oxford Revisited
Ramon Jiménez

In his recent biography of William Shakespeare, the critic Jonathan Bate writes: ‘Gathering what we can from his plays and poems: that is how we will write a biography that is true to him’ (xix). This statement acknowledges a widely recognized truth—that a writer’s work reflects his milieu, his experiences, his thoughts, and his own personality. It
was the remarkable gap between the known facts about Shakespeare of Stratford and the traits and characteristics of the author revealed in the Shakespeare canon that led an English schoolmaster to suppose that the real author was someone else, and to search for him in the backwaters of Elizabethan poetry.

This inquiry led him to conclude that ‘William Shakespeare’ was a nom de plume that concealed the identity of England’s greatest poet and dramatist, and that continued to hide it from readers, playgoers, and scholars for hundreds of years. In 1920, J. Thomas Looney published his unique work of investigative scholarship, demonstrating that the man behind the Shakespeare name and the Shakespeare canon was Edward de Vere, the 17th Earl of Oxford (1550-1604).1 Since then, hundreds of books and articles have augmented the evidence that this unconventional nobleman and courtier not only wrote the plays and poems attributed to Shakespeare, but concealed the fact of his authorship throughout his life. It appears that after his death his descendants and those in their service deliberately
substituted an alternative author and fabricated physical and literary evidence to perpetuate the fable.

The web of evidence associating Oxford with the Shakespeare canon is robust and far-reaching, and grows stronger and more complex every year. Although he was recognized by his contemporaries as an outstanding writer of poetry and plays, he is the only leading dramatist of the time whose name is not associated with a single play. This fact, alone, about any other person would be sufficient to stimulate intense interest and considerable research. Yet the Shakespearean academic community has not only failed to undertake this research itself, it has willfully and consistently refused to allow presentations or to publish research on the Authorship Question by anyone who disputes the Stratford theory. What Oxfordian research it does not ignore, it routinely dismisses, usually with scorn and sarcasm, as unworthy of serious consideration.

READ ENTIRE ARTICLE