Tag Archives: Folger Shakespeare Library

SOS-SF Joint Shakespeare Authorship Conference October 13-16, 2011 In Washington DC. Registration Form Now Available

The Shakespeare Oxford Society and The Shakespeare Fellowship Society
Present
The Washington DC Joint Authorship Conference

 October 13, 14, 15, and 16, 2011 in Washington, D.C.

A tour of the Folger Shakespeare Library has been scheduled for October 14.

The 2011 joint authorship conference sponsored by the Shakespeare Oxford Society and the Shakespeare Fellowship will be held in Washington DC from October 13-16. Arrangements have been made for a block of rooms at the Washington Court Hotel. The program will include a tour of the Folger Library with a viewing and discussion of the Earl of Oxford’s Geneva Bible.  Arrangements may be made for a trip to a local Cineplex for a group viewing of Anonymous.

The registration form is available by visiting the Shakespeare Oxford Society’s website:

http://www.shakespeare-oxford.com/?p=138

If you have any questions regarding the conference, please contact:

Shakespeare Oxford Society

P.O. Box 808

Yorktown Heights, NY 10598-0808

Telephone: 914-962-1717

sosoffice@optonline.net

Speakers who have already made proposals or signaled their intent to speak include Mark Anderson, Roger Stritmatter, Bonner Cutting, Gerit Quealy, Richard Waugaman, Ron Hess, Barbara Burris, Cheryl Eagan-Donovan, Tom Hunter, Tom Townsend, Albert Burgstahler and Earl Showerman.

The SOS and SF are dedicated to academic excellence, as defined through the independent scholarship of several generations of scholars, among them J.T. Looney, B.R. and B.M. Ward, Charles Wisner Barrell, Charlton Ogburn, Jr., Ruth Loyd Miller, and Mark Anderson, among others.

The primary focus of both organizations is to consider and advance the case already argued by these and other writers identifying Edward de Vere, 17th Earl of Oxford, as the true mind behind the mask of “Shakespeare.” Although papers exploring alternative authorship theories (e.g., Mary Sidney, Francis Bacon, etc.) are welcome, presenters should bear in mind that conference attendees are for the most part well versed in the arguments for and against Oxford’s authorship as presented in these seminal works. Those desiring an audience for alternative authorship scenarios, or writing from an orthodox “Stratfordian” perspective, should prepare themselves by carefully considering the expectations of their audience.

To inquire about submitting paper or for further information about the program, please contact:
John Hamill,   Earl Showerman,  or   Bonner Cutting.

The Conference is scheduled to begin just two weeks after the expected release of a Sony Pictures film, Anonymous, directed by Roland Emmerich and featuring a cast of Shakespearean thespian luminaries such as Vanessa Redgrave, David Thewlis, Joely Richardson, Rhys Ifans, and Sir Derek Jacobi.

A recently released trailer promoting Anonymous begins with this intriguing question:  “What if I told you Shakespeare never wrote a single word?”  Later in the trailer a male voice says:  “Promise me you’ll keep our secret safe.”  An older woman’s voice, presumably that of Queen Elizabeth played by Vanessa Redgrave, says ominously:  “None of your poems or your plays will ever carry your name.”

The tantalizing trailer ends with a clever tagline — “We’ve All Been Played” – followed by a stage filled with actors taking their bows and the audience applauding wildly.

Here’s the link to the trailer.  www.youtube.com/watch?v=uBmnkk0QW3Q&feature=channel_video_title

In light of the scheduled release of this major motion picture – the first-ever that explicitly challenges the traditional authorship theory – the Shakespeare Oxford Society reiterates its position that traditional scholars have been “Barding up the wrong tree” in Stratford-upon-Avon.   Indeed, there is a long and distinguished history of doubting the traditional “Stratfordian” attribution of the “Shakespeare” works. Noted doubters over the years include Mark Twain, Henry James, Orson Welles, Charlie Chaplin, and Sigmund Freud. More recent skeptics include U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia and former Justice John Paul Stevens along with renowned Shakespearean actors Derek Jacobi, Michael York, Jeremy Irons, and Mark Rylance, former artistic director at the Globe Theatre in London.

In 1996, the great Shakespearean actor Sir John Gielgud, while serving as president of the World Shakespeare Congress, signed the following petition:

“We, the undersigned, petition the Shakespeare Association of America, in light of ongoing research, to engage actively in a comprehensive, objective and sustained investigation of the authorship of the Shakespeare Canon, particularly as it relates to the claim of Edward de Vere, 17th Earl of Oxford.”

In 2007, the Shakespeare Authorship Coalition (SAC) began collecting signatures on a compelling “Declaration of Reasonable Doubt About the Identity of William Shakespeare.”   Concordia University in Portland, Oregon, and Brunel University in West London have launched degree programs in Shakespeare authorship studies.

About The Shakespeare Oxford Society
Founded in 1957, the Shakespeare Oxford Society is a nonprofit, educational organization dedicated to exploring the Shakespeare authorship question and researching the evidence that Edward de Vere, the 17th Earl of Oxford (1550 – 1604) is the true author of the poems and plays of “William Shakespeare. The homepage of the Society also says the group is “Dedicated to Researching and Honoring the True Bard.”  Visit www.shakespeare-oxford.com and www.shakespeareoxfordsociety.wordpress.com for more information.  SOS on Facebook.  Join SOS or renew your membership online here: http://www.goestores.com/catalog.aspx?Merchant=shakespeareoxfordsociety&DeptID=27020.

In First Folio, a New Novel by Scott Evans, the 17th Earl of Oxford Emerges As The Author of The “Shakespeare” Works

Below are some excerpts from an article in the local newspaper in Davis, CA — the Davis Enterprise.  Click HERE to read the entire article.  Congrats to Scott Evans on his new novel!  Note the info below about a Meet The Author event in Davis on March 18th.  Matthew
Davis Enterprise | Thursday, March 10th, 2011 | Posted by Chloe Kim
So, was Shakespeare a fraud?

Davis author Scott Evans' new novel,               "First Folio," is set partially in his hometown.               The literary mystery should appeal to fans of "The Da               Vinci Code," Evans says. Wayne Tilcock/Enterprise               photo

Davis author Scott Evans’ new novel, “First Folio,” is set partially in his hometown. The literary mystery should appeal to fans of “The Da Vinci Code,” Evans says. Wayne Tilcock/Enterprise photo

In Scott Evans’ new novel, “First Folio,” priceless handwritten manuscripts reveal that the most famous writer in the world — William Shakespeare — was a fraud, and that the true author of Shakespeare’s iconic plays actually was Edward de Vere, the 17th Earl of Oxford.

The book is fiction, and the Bard hasn’t really been officially dethroned. But other than that, and “the fact that Joe (the main character) receives handwritten documents, which don’t exist, all other factual information is well-researched and true,” said Evans, a Davis author.

“There are few samples of Shakespeare’s handwriting, all of which are signatures on legal documents. The handwriting is pretty halting and poor. It doesn’t look like something an experienced writer would produce,” Evans said.

Evans explores this conundrum in “First Folio,” a literary mystery that he says fans of “The Da Vinci Code” will enjoy.

The main character is Joe Conrad, a professor at the fictional Central Lutheran University in Stockton, who lives in Davis. His mentor, Jack Claire, finds what seem to be authentic handwritten manuscripts of Shakespeare’s plays, along with a leather-bound copy of the First Folio, the first collection of Shakespeare’s plays.

[SNIP]

Local residents can meet him at 3 p.m. Sunday at Atria Covell Gardens, 1111 Alvarado Ave. in Davis. Bistro 33, 226 F St., also will host a reading and reception from 7 to 9 p.m. Friday, March 18, and Evans will be at The Avid Reader, 617 Second St., at 7:30 p.m. Friday, March 25.

Meet the author

Who: Scott Evans, author of “First Folio”

When: 3 p.m. Sunday

Where: Atria Covell Gardens, 1111 Alvarado Ave., Davis

Showerman speaks on Folger edu-blog

Shakespeare Fellowship President Earl Showerman posted a comment about Greek influences in Hamlet to the Folger Shakespeare Library’s Making a Scene: Shakespeare in the Classroom educational blog on February 14, 2010. Showerman’s commentary supported a February 12, 2010 post by Folger Education Programs Administrative Assistant Caitlin Smith titled, “The Greeks and Shakespeare”.

In her discussion of Orestes in the February 12 post, Smith said:

Shakespeare’s plays, too, have a certain je ne sais quoi which allows them to stay present in the public eye, and even Shakespeare may have been influenced by Greek Tragedy.  Take, for example, HAMLET and ORESTES: They both involve the murder of a king by a relative. The protagonists find themselves denied their fathers’thrones by newly wedded couples. Both Orestes and Hamlet experience periods of madness, and their revenge takes the lives of both the mother and her new husband. Also, both stories place great emphasis on the importance of faithful friendship (in Plyades and Horatio) vs. seeming friendship (in Rosencrantz and Guildenstern, and Menelaus).

Showerman augmented Smith’s post with a lengthy and specific commentary on Hamlet‘s Greek influences, and closed with the request:

Is it not time that Jonson’s misleading claim of Shakespeare’s ‘lesse Greek’ as regards Euripides’ influence on the playwright be broadly challenged by the academy?

***

Folger edu-blog

The Folger Shakespeare Library’s education blog, Making a Scene: Shakespeare in the Classroom, is a rich resource for every Shakespeare-lover. In his November 13 post, “Folger Education at NCTE“, Folger’s Senior Consultant for National Education Mike LoMonico laid out a fabulous list of Folger offerings highlighted by Folger staff at the National Council of Teachers of English 2009 convention held in Philadelphia last month.

Among the Folger offerings, LoMonico said:

. . . We will be showing off our new Teacher Toolkit and its contents which includes two DVDs, a 2GB USB flash drive with podcasts, videos, images from our collection, and lots of handouts and edited scenes. We will also be answering all of your questions about Institutes, Workshops, and the rest of our resources.

The NCTE serves all levels of students — elementary through college, and would be a good partner in the Shakespeare authorship endeavor. Their 2010 annual convention will be held Nov. 18-23 in Orlando, Florida. Deadline for proposals submitted electronically is Jan. 20, 2010.

Sources:
http://folgereducation.wordpress.com/2009/11/13/folger-education-at-ncte/http://www.ncte.org/annual

Folger “new media” submissions to be reviewed on Web

The Folger Shakespeare Library will conduct an “open review” of essays submitted for a special issue of Shakespeare Quarterly, themed “Shakespeare and New Media”.

For Shakespeare critics and scholars, among the most significant consequences of media change will be transformations in how we communicate about our work and publish new research. In keeping with the topic of its special issue, “Shakespeare and New Media,” Shakespeare Quarterly is conducting an experiment in open peer review which will apply only to the special issue. After the initial editorial evaluation, authors will be invited to opt into the open review process. For those who do, their essays will be posted online for public commentary and feedback by the journal’s readers. Authors may respond to this feedback before submitting their revised essays for final selection by the editors. (Authors who decline the open review and opt for a traditional review will not be penalized in the selection process.)

Source: Folger Shakespeare Library

The Library is working with MediaCommons, a digital network dedicated to promoting scholarly discourse about media studies and the digital humanities, on this project.

Deadline for “Shakespeare and New Media” essays is Jan 15, 2010. The open review period will run March 1 through May 5, 2010. The Folger recommends contacting editor contact Katherine Rowe at krowe@brynmawr.edu for information about the special issue “Shakespeare and New Media” or about Shakespeare Quarterly.