Tag Archives: Hank Whittemore

The Shakespeare Oxford Society and the Shakespeare Fellowship Announce Details For Their 2013 Toronto Joint Conference, October 17 – 20

The theme of this year’s Shakespeare Authorship Conference is “Shakespeare and the Living Theatre.” It will be presented with support of the Theatre and Drama departments of York University and the University of Guelph, two major Canadian universities.

Conference organizer Professor Don Rubin of Toronto’s York University stated “The man who wrote under the name of Shakespeare, was clearly a man of the theatre. We know that William of Stratford had connections to the Globe but few people know that the 17th Earl of Oxford, also had significant theatre connections to both adult and children’s companies of the period.” “We are hoping that the Conference will offer new understandings of these connections as well as insights into theatrical conditions of the time and put to rest the idea that William of Stratford was the only candidate in the authorship debate with strong and profound theatrical involvement.”

There will be a variety of papers on related subjects presented as well as a trip to Canada’s internationally-acclaimed Stratford Festival to see a production of The Merchant of Venice, including a chance to meet and talk with the director of the production (and also the new Artistic Director of the Stratford Festival), Antoni Cimolino.

A preliminary list of speakers and topics is provided below:

Toronto Conference Schedule

                   The following program is subject to change.         

Thursday, 17 October   

    12:00-1:00   Registration

    1:00-1:15     Welcome. Opening of Conference.

    1:15-2:00      Shelly Maycock.  (Virginia)

                         “Essex, Oxford and the Concept of Popularity in Late Elizabethan

                         Discourse.”  How the notion of popularity can be recast from an 

                         Oxfordian perspective.

    2:00-2:45      Priscilla Costello.  (Ontario)

                         “Astrology Confirms de Vere.”   A professional astrologer compares the

                          astrological charts of de Vere and “Shakespeare.”

    2:45-3:30     Ron Halstead.  (Michigan)

                         “Death of a Dictator: The Dangerous Timeliness of Julius Caesar and

                          the Authorship Question.”  De Vere’s interest in rebellion.

    3:30-3:50    Coffee break

    3:50-4:35  Walter Hurst.  (North Carolina)

                           “What’s Your Authority for that Statement: An Approach to

                             Examining External Evidence in Early Modern Authorship.”

                             How to evaluate the strength of historical evidence.

    4:35-6:00         Video: The Naked Shakespeare

                           A new video on the authorship question from Germany.

 

Friday, 18 October 

     8:30-9:15       Ron Hess.  (Georgia)

                            “The Significant History of The Passionate Pilgrim.” Did this work

                              predate both Venus and Adonis and Rape of Lucrece?

     9:15-10:0        Heward Wilkinson.  (UK)

                            “Coleridge and the Implications of Authorial Self-Awareness in

                              Shakespeare.”   There is no sign that the Stratford man embodied

                              the consciousness of “Shakespeare” while there is substantial testimony

                              that Oxford did.

    10:45-10:45     Michael Egan. (New Mexico)

                            “The Shakespeare Grain Dealer Uproar.”  The documented facts about

                             Shakspere’s financial arrangements, when compared with the plays, show

                             clearly that we are dealing with two distinct individuals, the man from

                             Stratford and the man who wrote the plays.

    10:45 –11:05   Coffee Break

    11:05-11:50     Tom Regnier. (Florida)

                              “Could Ben Jonson Think Like A Lawyer? Taking a Closer

                               Look at Clarkson and Warren.”   A revaluation of the 1942 study on

                               property law in Elizabethan drama which disparages Shakespeare’s

                               legal knowledge.

    11:50-12:35      Earl Showerman. (Oregon)

                              “A Midsummer Night’s Dream: Shakespeare’s Aristophanic Comedy.”

                               Was Shakespeare acquainted with Athenian drama?  The former

                               President of the SF explores the territory.

                                Lunch on own

     3:00               Bus leaves for the Stratford Festival

                                (Tom Regnier paper on “The Law and Merchant” on bus)

     5:00               Arrive at Stratford.  Meeting with Antoni Cimolino (Director

                                of Merchant)  followed by “on own’ dinner                

      8:00               Merchant of Venice on Festival Stage                      

     10:30             Bus returns to Toronto (arrives about 12:30 a.m.)

 

Saturday, 19 October

            8:30-9:30      Annual Meeting of the Shakespeare Oxford Society

9:30-10:15     Cheryl Eagan-Donovan. (Massachusetts)

                         “The Reason for the Alias: Oxford’s Bisexuality and

                           the Elizabethan Theatre.”  A look at the sexual 

                           behavior of  bothactors and audiences of the

                           period suggests that Oxford’s Sexuality may have                                been a prime reason for the pseudonym.  

           

10:15-11:00    Hank Whittemore. (New York)

                                    “The Unbroken Line: Oxford, Acting Companies and the

                                    Phenomenon of Shakespeare.”  A look at de Vere as guiding

                                    force behind the three most important acting companies

                                    of Elizabeth’s reign.

11:00-11:15    The Missing Debate: A Comment. Don Rubin and Keir Cutler.

11:15-12:00      Roger Stritmatter (Maryland) and Lynne Kositsky (Ontario)

                         ‘Much Ado About Nothing: The Tempest Debate.” Two major

                         scholars put the Tempest dating debate to rest.    

            12:00-12:15       The Tempest Book launch/signing (Roger and Lynne)

           

12:15-1:45      Lunch (buffet with Keynote)

                        Mark Anderson (Massachusetts)

                        “Shakespeare, Newton and Einstein: Listening to the Obsession

                        of Genius.”  The author of the major de Vere biography, Shakespeare

                        By Another Name looks at the nature of genius and obsession.

 2:00-2:45        Robert Detobel/Henno Wember  (Germany)

                        “The Outcast State: Oxford’s Passion for the Theatre.”  Was it

                        his love of the theatre that led to Oxford’s “outcast state?”

 2:45 to 3:30    Keir Cutler (Quebec)

                         ‘From Crackpot to Mainstream: The Evolution of the Authorship

                        Question.”  Are the doubts about the man from Stratford becoming

                        mainstream? An actor suggests that the answer is “yes.”

3:30 to 4:15      Sky Gilbert (Ontario)

                         “Was Shakespeare A Euphuist?”  The connections between Shakespeare

                           and Lyly, between Endymion and Twelfth Night done with student actors. 

4:15 to 4:35      Coffee break

4:35 to 6:35    Canadian Premiere Screening: Last Will and Testament

Introduction of this full-length film by the directors – Lisa and Laura     Wilson.                                          

 

 Sunday, 20 October

 8:30-9:30         Annual Meeting of the Shakespeare Fellowship

 9:30-10:20       Ramon Jimenez (California)

                          ‘Shakespeare’s Two Lear Plays: How the Playwright Transformed His

                          First Romance into his Last Tragedy.”  From King Leir to King Lear.

10:20-11:20       Michael Morse. (Tennessee)

                           “What the Thunder Said and Tom O’Bedlam’s Song.”  Views of Lear.

11:20-12:15        Gerit Quealey. (New York)

                            “Studying Authorship: Why It Matters for Actors. The Road

                              To Revelation.”  How authorship research can inform and illuminate

                               A Text.” A working actor demonstrates her points with student actors.

12:15-2:00         Closing Banquet with Keynote.  Awards and Final words.

    John  Shahan (California).

    “The Shakespeare Authorship Coalition: Future Strategies.” The

    head of SAC and one of the editors of the volume Shakespeare Beyond

The conference will also include the annual general meetings of both organizations, which, because of the proposed unification of the two organizations, should not be missed.

The conference will be held at the Metropolitan Hotel in Toronto; registrants may receive a conference rate of $135/night at the hotel by calling 800-668-6600 or by e-mail at reservations@tor.metropoliton.com. Please mention Reservation ID#269-931 or the SOS or the SF. This hotel room rate will be good for up to three days before and after the conference for those who wish to extend their visit to Toronto. This rate is guaranteed for reservations made before September 17.

Transportation from the Toronto airport directly to the hotel can be obtained from Airport Express (905-564-6333 or http://www.torontoairportexpress.com). Rates are $27.95 one-way and $42.00 for round trip. There is a 5% discount for ordering online. There is a 10% senior and student discount for one-way only ($25) so this is not practical if you want a round trip.

Full registration for the conference includes all presentations and materials as well as lunch on Saturday and Sunday. Per day rates are also available. Registration is also possible onsite, including reduced daily rates for Saturday and Sunday that do not include lunch.

Please note, however, that the trip to Stratford may not be available for registrations received after September 15. 

For more conference information or to register for the conference, please visit www.Shakespeare-Oxford.com.

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Ashland — Shakespeare Authorship Conference Schedule (Sept. 16-19, 2010)

Thought folks might want to see some additional details about the upcoming Shakespeare Authorship Conference schedule.  You can register online for the Shakespeare Fellowship/Shakespeare Oxford Society’s  SF/SOS Annual Conference — Sept. 16-19, 2010 in Ashland, Oregon at the online registration site: http://www.goestores.com/catalog.aspx?Merchant=shakespeareoxfordsociety

Shakespeare Fellowship
and Shakespeare Oxford Society

2010 Conference Schedule

On-site registration check-in will begin at 9:00 AM on September 16, and the education program will begin at 10:00 AM.

Conference registration includes an opening reception with appetizers on the 16th, buffet lunches on day two and three, and the annual awards banquet at the conclusion of the conference on the afternoon of the 19th.

Saturday afternoon will be dedicated to performances with music provided by the lute duet Mignarda, Ron Andrico and Donna Stewart, creators of My Lord of Oxenford’s Maske. OSF all-star Robin Goodrin-Nordli will present her original show, Bard Babes, and Keir Cutler will give an encore performance of his adaptation of Mark Twain’s satire, Is Shakespeare Dead? The afternoon will conclude with a signing ceremony for the ‘Declaration of Reasonable Doubt’.

Thursday: September 16

Music by Mignarda with Ron Andrico and Donna Stewart
Prof Tom Gage: The Bone in the Elephant’s Heart
Dr. Tom Hunter: The Invention of the Human in Shylock 
Dr. Earl Showerman: Shakespeare’s Shylock and the Strange Case of Gaspar Ribeiro
Cheryl Eagan-Donovan: Shakespeare’s Ideal: Sexuality and Gender Identity in The Merchant of Venice
Dr. Marty Hyatt: Teaching Heavy Ignorance Aloft to Fly
Conference Opening Reception – Ashland Springs Hotel Conservatory & Garden
Merchant of Venice at OSF Elizabethan Theatre

Friday: September 17

Shakespeare Fellowship Annual Meeting
Richard Whalen: ‘Goats and Monkeys!’ Othello’s Outburst Recalls a Fresco in Bassano, Italy
Dr. Frank Davis: The “Unlearned” versus the “Learned” Shakespeare
Prof Jack Shuttleworth: Hamlet and Its Mysteries: An Oxfordian Editor’s View
Merchant of Venice Panel: Tom Hunter, Tom Regnier & OSF Actors
Bill Rauch: Artistic Director of OSF and Director of Hamlet and Merchant of Venice
Prof Roger Stritmatter: The “Little Eyases” and the “Innovation” of 1589
Katherine Chiljan: Twelve “Too Early” Allusions to Shakespeare’s Hamlet
Tom Regnier: Hamlet’s Law
Prof Sam Saunders: The Odds on Hamlet’s Odds
Prof Helen Gordon: The Symbols in Hamlet: An Oxfordian Interpretation
Hamlet at OSF Bowmer Theatre

Saturday: September 18

Shakespeare-Oxford Society Annual Meeting
Hank Whittemore: The Birth and Growth of Prince Hal: Why did Oxford write The Famous Victories of Henry the Fifth?
Marie Merkel – “In the Fit of Miming”: A brief history of Sir John Falstaffe and the “whole school of tongues” in his belly
Lynne Kositsky: The Young Adult Novel Minerva’s Voyage and its Relationship to True Reportory and Minerva Britanna
Hamlet panel: Prof Ren Draya, Jack Shuttleworth & OSF Actors
Music by Mignarda
Robin Goodrin Nordli: Bard Babes
Keir Cutler: Is Shakespeare Dead?
“Declaration of Reasonable Doubt” Signing Ceremony with John Shahan, Paul Nicholson, Executive Director at OSF, and other signatories
1 Henry IV at OSF Elizabethan Theatre

Sunday: September 19

William Ray: Proofs of Oxfordian Authorship in the Shakespearean Apocrypha
Bonner Cutting: Let the Punishment Fit the Crime
John Hamill – Bisexuality, Bastardy, Avisa and Antonio Perez Revisited
Michael Cecil: Revisiting the 1st Baron Burghley’s Precepts for the Well Ordering and Carriage of a Man’s Life
Henry IV Panel: Felicia Londré & OSF Actors
2010 Annual Joint Conference Awards Banquet

For further information write to the local coordinator at earlees@charter.net

Whittemore retort

Hank Whittemore has written a brilliant essay in “Reply to Critics of Those Who Study the Shakespeare Authorship . . .” on his Hank Whittemore’s Shakespeare Blog. On Friday, September 25, Whittemore said:

It’s tiresome to read the negative remarks about those of us who doubt the traditional view of Shakespeare authorship and who have concluded that Edward de Vere Earl of Oxford wrote the great works. For example, the latest one [from Alex Beam of the Boston Globe] asserts: “The search for the ‘real’ Shakespeare is a collective madness … “.

Read the entire essay at: http://hankwhittemore.wordpress.com/2009/09/25/a-reply-to-critics-of-those-who-study-the-shakespeare-authorship-and-a-challenge/

September SOS news out this week

The September 2009 issue of the Shakespeare Oxford Newsletter will be mailed this week. This hefty, 48-page issue features:

· scholarly articles listed below,
· John Shahan’s response to skeptic Michael Shermer’s challenge in Scientific American also available on the SOS blog at: https://shakespeareoxfordsociety.wordpress.com/2009/08/02/shahans-letter-to-shermer-the-skeptic/
· updates on Cheryl Eagan-Donovan’s film project, “Nothing is Truer than Truth”,
· and the Paul Altrocchi and Hank Whittemore multi-volume project Building the Case for Edward deVere as Shakespeare also available on the SOS blog at: https://shakespeareoxfordsociety.wordpress.com/2009/07/04/altrocchiwhittemore-build-the-case/
· as well as news items and reviews by Richard Whelan and Stephanie Hughes.

Scholarly articles include:
· Marie Merkel’s “Ben Jonson and The Tempest” – was the play by Shakespeare?
· Derran Charlton’s “Edward de Vere as Henry IV” – was Oxford on the stage?
· William Ray’s “Proofs of Oxfordian Authorship in the Shakespearean Apocrypha” – did Oxford ghost for Anne Vavasour?
· Robert Prechter’s “Sombody We Know Is behind No-body and Some-body” – was de Vere writing plays long before Shakespeare appeared on the scene?

Hardcopy of the newsletter is available as a benefit of Shakespeare-Oxford Society membership. Support SOS by joining online at:
http://www.goestores.com/catalog.aspx?Merchant=shakespeareoxfordsociety&DeptID=27020.

SOS membership also includes hardcopy of the SOS annual journal, The Oxfordian — a new issue of The Oxfordian is due out in time for the SF/SOS joint conference in Houston November 5-8, 2009.

Newsletter articles from all issues since January 1999 through the current issue (after a brief six-week embargo) are available free online through local, university, and state libraries under the Academic OneFile listing.

For example, I can log onto the Michigan state e-library at: http://mel.org by using my Michigan driver’s license, and access all files on the Academic OneFile listing that includes the Shakespeare-Oxford Newsletter. Articles are also available online through subscription to the Gale Group Access My Library site at: http://www.accessmylibrary.com/coms2/browse_JJ_S091.

Linda Theil, Editor
Shakespeare Oxford Newsletter

Commentary on Post article

Click below for a transcript of the live discussion of the August 30 Washington Post article titled Waiting for William with reporter Sally Jenkins held at noon on Aug. 31, 2009.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/discussion/2009/08/27/DI2009082703390.html

Mark Anderson’s commentary on the Post article:
http://shakespearebyanothername.blogspot.com/2009/08/overbury-overdrive-part-749-shakespeare.html

Hank Whittemore’s commentary on the Post article:
http://hankwhittemore.wordpress.com/2009/08/30/nonsense-from-the-washington-post/

Linda Theil’s commentary on Post article:
http://oberonshakespearestudygroup.blogspot.com/2009/08/authorship-cover-story-in-washington.html

K.C. Ligon (1948-2009)

K.C. Ligon (1948-2009) in 1981

K.C. Ligon (1948-2009) in 1981

Remembering K.C. — Hank Whittemore memorializes an Oxfordian friend

Friends, colleagues and students of Katherine Dunfee Clarke (K.C.) Ligon gathered on June 22 in New York to celebrate the life of this multi-talented and beloved actress, dialect coach, teacher, writer and leader of the modern Oxfordian movement, who died on March 23 at age sixty after battling a long illness. The memorial service took place in the heart of the Broadway theatre district on a Monday evening — when most stages are dark — at the legendary Circle in the Square, where K.C. was on the faculty of the Theatre School specializing in voice, speech and dialects.

In a parallel life, K.C. was deeply involved in the effort to establish Edward de Vere as Shakespeare. Twenty years ago she won a playwriting contest sponsored by Ruth Miller (1922-2005), a giant of Oxfordian research, and they became close friends. She served on the Board of Trustees of the Shakespeare Fellowship, was a top contributor to its website discussion forum (logging 4,871 posts since 2002) and wrote articles for the various Oxfordian publications.  Recently she co-authored “The Harvey-Nashe Quarrel and Love’s Labor’s Lost” with German scholar Robert Detobel that is published on Robert Brazil’s Elizabethan Authors website. She also created three blogs: K.C. Ligon’s Blog: About Theatrical, Truly Shakespearean Life, Shakespeare and Elizabeth: The Myth and the Reality, and Actors and Accents: The Actors’ Dialect Workbook.

At her memorial, after the crowd took seats at one end of the Circle’s theater-in-the-round, speaker after speaker turned the occasion into an emotion-charged outpouring of affection mixed with laughter and tears, prompted by anecdotes about K.C. as a tough-minded, bluntly honest, thoroughly professional teacher and coach with deep reservoirs of empathy along with humor and insight as well as personal style and flair.

K.C. was fond of saying she had been a professional performer most of her life, born to it, not in a trunk but appearing on stage even before she was born – in 1948, when her mother Nora Dunfee was acting in Red Peppers by Noel Coward.  She made her Broadway debut at eight in the Dylan Thomas play Under Milk Wood and at eleven appeared with both parents — her father was actor David Clarke — in the national tour of The Visit with Alfred Lunt and Lynn Fontanne. A member of the first graduating class of New York University Tish School of the Arts Graduate Acting Program, she built an impressive resume of stage and television credits while also becoming a professional writer.

K.C. designed dialects for entire Broadway productions and for regional theatre companies around the country. As a dialect consultant she worked with scores of extraordinary actors such as James Earl Jones, Philip Seymour Hoffman and Estelle Parsons. She also worked with actor Tom Ligon – whom she married in 1976 and who, at the memorial, introduced a video montage of K.C. in photographs that was both funny and deeply moving.

Also at the service was K.C.’s younger sister, Susan Dunfee; Theodore Mann, co-founder of the Circle in the Square Theatre; actor-director Austin Pendleton; and many others who told how K.C. had “performed miracles” helping hundreds of professional performers and students with phrasings, breath control, accents and interpretations of their acting roles.

One graduate of her instructions told how K.C. transformed a young man who “sounded like a thug” into a polished professional announcer; another recalled that after K.C. became too ill to travel uptown to the Theatre School, she summoned everyone down to her apartment in Greenwich Village and held class there. Tom Ligon described how she was able to help actors adopt dialects indirectly, that is, by immersing them within their characters’ settings until their accents and speech patterns began to change on their own.

By the time it was my turn to speak I realized I was opening a window on a related yet very different aspect of K.C.’s life – the Oxfordian world. I found myself talking about our friendship, our talks on the phone, conversations by email and many long, often daily discussions about various topics surrounding the issue of Shakespearean authorship. When I took my seat again a woman rose to her feet and recalled how K.C. had spoken to her often about the Earl of Oxford, citing the evidence for his authorship of the Shakespeare works.

“So when I heard she died,” the woman said, “I imagined her ascending into heaven and looking down upon us, with that sultry smile of hers, and saying, ‘I was right, wasn’t I!'”

Yes, K.C., you were right — in so many, many ways.

Hank Whittemore is a former professional actor and the author of eleven books including The Monument, elucidating the world of Shakespeare’s sonnets (www.shakespearesmonument.com). He currently performs a solo show based on the book, entitled Shake-speare’s Treason (www.shakespearestreason.com), co-written with Ted Story, director.  He lives in Nyack, New York, with his wife Glo and their son Jake.  Hank also produces a blog (http://hankwhittemore.wordpress.com).

K.C. Ligon’s blogs are available on the Web at:


Altrocchi/Whittemore build the case

The first five volumes of a new series of books entitled BUILDING THE CASE FOR EDWARD DE VERE AS SHAKESPEARE, edited by Paul Hemenway Altrocchi and Hank Whittemore, has just (June 2009) become available online at: http://www.iuniverse.com/Bookstore, Amazon, and Barnes & Noble.

The series – which attempts to preserve authorship research in book form for scholars, students and general readers – begins with work done in the early twentieth century leading to Shakespeare Identified by J. Thomas Looney in 1920 and continues up to the 1960’s, with more volumes envisioned in the near future.

Most of the early literature pointing to Edward de Vere as the author of the Shakespeare works appeared in obscure newsletters, magazines and now out-of-print books. Some of this initial research work is of elegant quality and only recently emerged from years of storage by two of England’s authorship groups, the De Vere Society and the Shakespearean Authorship Trust. When, in 2006, Professor William Leahy of Brunel University organized the first graduate degree program in the world on Shakespeare Authorship Studies, both societies permanently loaned their books and papers to the English Department of Brunel, located in Uxbridge, a suburb of London.

Through the courtesy of Kevin Gilvary, President of the De Vere Society, Charles Beauclerk and other members of the Board of Trustees of the Shakespeare Authorship Trust, and Dr. Leahy, the editors were able to peruse and copy this vitally important early Shakespeare authorship material. Thus these difficult-to-find articles and book excerpts now become readily available in the first five volumes of this book series entitled Building the Case for Edward de Vere as Shakespeare.

Editor Paul Hemenway Altrocchi has a unique credential for this book series, being the longest-duration Oxfordian in the world-more than sixty years. Educated at Harvard University and Harvard Medical School, he trained in Neurology at the New York Neurological Institute of Columbia University, did research at the National Institute of Neurological Diseases in Bethesda, Maryland, and was on the full-time faculty of Stanford Medical School before ending his career in private practice. Since retirement in 1998, he has spent most of his time researching the candidacy of Edward de Vere as Shakespeare, publishing twenty-three scholarly papers and a book entitled Most Greatly Lived, A Biographical Novel of Edward de Vere, Seventeenth Earl of Oxford, Whose Pen Name was William Shakespeare.

Editor Hank Whittemore is a professional author of ten books and hundreds of magazine articles, an actor and playwright, and an Oxfordian for a quarter of a century. He has written more than two dozen articles on the Shakespeare authorship question from an Oxfordian perspective. After ten years of research, in 2005 he published his major scholarly contribution entitled The Monument, an eight-hundred page opus analyzing every line and every word of Shakespeare’s Sonnets, providing powerful new evidence that Edward de Vere was William Shakespeare.

Volumes in the Series
VOLUME 1: THE GREAT SHAKESPEARE HOAX
After Unmasking the Fraudulent Pretender,
Search for the True Genius Begins

VOLUME 2: NOTHING TRUER THAN TRUTH
Fact Versus Fiction in the
Shakespeare Authorship Debate

VOLUME 3: SHINE FORTH
Evidence Grows Rapidly in Favor of
Edward de Vere as Shakespeare

VOLUME 4: MY NAME BE BURIED
A Coerced Pen Name Forces the
Real Shakespeare into Anonymity

VOLUME 5: SO RICHLY SPUN
Four Hundred Years of Deceit are Enough.
Edward de Vere is Shakespeare

The books are available in both hardcover and paperback. On iUniverse the paperback volumes are priced at $6.00 while the hardcovers are $27.95. The books may also be ordered by phone from IUniverse at 800-288-4677 ext. 5024.

Information courtesy of Hank Whittemore. For more information, see Hank Whittemore’s Shakespeare Blog.

Marie Merkel’s The First Mousetrap online

The introduction to Marie Merkel’s as yet unpublished book, The First Mousetrap is online at http://www.thefirstmousetrap.org

Hank Whittemore, author of The Monument: Shakespeare’s Sonnets by Edward de Vere, Earl of Oxford, said today on Nina Green’s Phaeton email list:

I believe her insights into Titus as related to the Howards are persuasive as well as boldly new — a real discovery for us, it would seem.

The full title of Merkel’s book is —
The First Mousetrap: Titus Andronicus & the Tudor Massacre of the Howards
With the wrongful deaths of:
Anne Boleyn, Queen of England (beheaded 1526
Catherine Howard, Queen of England (beheaded 1542)
Henry Howard, poet earl of Surrey (beheaded 1547)
Thomas Howard, 4th duke of Norfolk (beheaded 1572)
& several other unfortunate Howards, never before deciphered.

Merkel said: That knavish piece of work, Titus Andronicus, is actually an ingenious device, designed by its author (most likely, the same that gave us King Lear) to catch the conscience of the queen, a guilty creature with the blood of her own kin on her hands.

According to her website, a condensed version of chapter 1, entitled “Tyrant’s Crests and Tombs of Brass” will appear in the 2009 issue of The Oxfordian.

Merkel will speak on the topic of Ben Jonson’s pervasive influence on The Tempest at the Symposium: Shakespeare from an Oxfordian Perspective in Watertown, Massachusettes on May 30th, 2009.