Tag Archives: Shakespeare Authorship

Boston Globe Obituary: Elliott Stone, 79, lover of art, including the art of conversation

It is my sad duty to post this obituary about a fellow Oxfordian and former member of the Shakespeare Oxford Society’s Board of Trustees.  I served with Elliott on the Board for a few years and was very fond of him.  He was a tireless, informed and well-respected advocate of the Earl of Oxford as the man behind the Shakespeare works.  Elliott’s energy, devotion, and strong and reasoned voice will be missed.  Here are a few graphs from and a link to the complete obituary that ran in the Boston Globe.   BTW … I learned something about Elliott in the obituary.  I had no idea he ran against Tip O’Neill for Congress.   With my deepest condolences to Elliott’s family … Matthew

 

ELLIOTT STONE

Arguing without being argumentative, Elliott Stone brought the vibrancy of youth throughout his life to discussions of his passions in art and literature that he conceded some might find obsessive.

“I am deeply involved in promoting the case of Edward de Vere, 17th earl of Oxford, as the true author of the Shakespeare canon,’’ he wrote several years ago, adding that “my friends and relatives are all aware of my need to immerse myself in this topic and do their best to interest me in other topics.’’

They didn’t have to work too hard. For Mr. Stone, taking the Bard of Avon down a notch always took a back seat to showering generous attention on those around him.

“Dad looked at the interests of each child and grandchild specifically and individually — from football to tennis to elephants,’’ his daughter Leslie, of Brooklyn, N.Y., said at his memorial service last month. “He took the time to talk to people and took an interest in their interests.’’

READ MORE … click link below.

Derran Charlton Remembers His Longtime Friend and Fellow Oxdordian Verily Anderson

My friend Derran Charlton was kind enough to submit the following words of remembrance upon the passing of his longtime dear friend and fellow Oxfordian, Verily Anderson. Derran has submitted a longer article for publication in the Shakespeare Oxford Newsletter. Readers may want to refer to this link to read Derran’s article published in the Oberon Shakespeare Study Group online newsletter. http://oberonshakespearestudygroup.blogspot.com/2010/07/oxfordian-verily-anderson-paget-passes.html

By Derran Charlton

It is with the deepest regret that I notify readers of the passing from nature to eternity of Verily Anderson Paget, aged 95.

Verily died at home, in her own bed. A true blessing. I was speaking to her only yesterday.

Verily confirmed that she was to visit her doctor, who would “probably congratulate her on her excellent good health!” She was extremely robust, and was awarded a cycling award by Prince Charles. Also the Charlton Ogburn Jr award for Oxfordianism. One of Verily`s many enthusiasms was to walk her guide-dog, Alfie, through her glorious woodlands most days.

Verily must have been the oldest surviving Oxfordian, having been introduced to Oxfordianism by her first husband over 70 years ago; in fact her husband, a playwright, poet, player, and play-producer had been a
friend and colleague of John Thomas Looney
(1870-1944).

Verily`s close friends/relations ranged from Royalty, Archbishops, Statesmen, Military Leaders, Lords Leiutenants, winners of Victoria Crosses, and Nobel Peace Prizes.

Her first-cousin was Walter Falcon Scott — the famous “Scott of the Antarctic.” Charles Darwin was a g.g.g. uncle. Florence Nightingale was a g.g.g. aunt. One of her cousins owned the Elizabethan house that originally belonged to Sir Horatio Vere, at
Tilbury-juxta-Clare. Her traceable family ancestry dated from 932.

Verily was the joint-Patron of the D.V.S., together with Sir Derek Jacobi. She was also a prolific writer having written 53 published books and films, including her Oxfordian endeavor The de Veres of Castle Hedingham. Only yesterday she told me that she had just completed her 53rd book A History of Herstmonceaux Castle for the University of Canada.

Verily leaves four daughters and one son Edward, who was deliberately named in honor of Edward de Vere and christened at the same 1563 church in Stoke Newington where Henry de Vere, 18th earl of Oxford, had been christened.

Her death has come as a tremendous shock to all who were truly blessed by her extraordinary life and personality.

A true Lady has passed our way. We are all deeply inspired and most grateful.

Ohio Valley Shakespeare Conference call for papers on Shakespeare’s loose ends

The Ohio Valley Shakespeare Conference 2010 has put out a call for papers on the topic of Shakespeare’s “Loose Ends” for the conference to be held October 14-16 at Owens College, Toledo campus. 

According to the call for papers (complete document included at end of this post):

The planning committee of the Ohio Valley Shakespeare Conference is seeking abstracts and paper proposals that investigate the gaps, lacunae, indeterminacies, omissions, silences and “undecidabilities” in the work of Shakespeare and/or his contemporaries. Papers can focus on individual works (E.g. what happened to Lear’s Fool? Why is Isabella silent?), or on cultural, dramaturgical, cinematic, theoretical and editorial issues. How do actors, directors and editors deal with the inevitable gap between players and performers? How do biases and the historical treatment of Shakespeare reflect and affect appreciation? How have biographers dealt with Shakespeare’s early years?

This seemed like a topic that might lend itself to authorship issues, so SOS News Online contacted OVSC 2010 director and Owens College professor, Dr. Russ Bodi.

SOS-NO: Our readers are interested in the question of authorship and we wondered if you cared to make a comment on whether the topic of this year’s conference might lend itself to authorship issues.

Dr. Bodi:

The OVSC is always open to the free exchange of ideas, but our membership does not seem to be inclined to doubt Shakespeare’s authorship.   So, we are open to submissions by anyone, and we can understand why the authorship question people might see an opportunity in our topic. However, it is not a topic we have designed into the conference, but as open-minded scholars, we do not exclude it as an option. 

Since we are looking to fill “gaps” and “inconsistencies” we cannot patently rule out the authorship question. However, our scholarly interest lies more in the works themselves than in who wrote them. We also welcome all submissions that deal with cultural issues of the times. We will nevertheless judge proposals on their scholarly merits.

I will be happy to receive any inquiries from your group.

SOS-NO: Do you have any information about registration to the conference by non-presenters who want to hear the papers and perhaps attend the performance?

Dr Bodi:

We do not have registration information yet. I am still working on the details. However, if you go to the following link, http://www.marietta.edu/departments/English/OVSC/ you will be able to access all the present and future updates.

***

Ohio Valley Shakespeare Conference 2010

A Call for Papers
Shakespeare’s “Loose Ends”
Owens College, Toledo, Ohio Campus
October 14-16, 2010

The planning committee of the Ohio Valley Shakespeare Conference is seeking abstracts and paper proposals that investigate the gaps, lacunae, indeterminacies, omissions, silences and “undecidabilities” in the work of Shakespeare and/or his contemporaries. Papers can focus on individual works (E.g. what happened to Lear’s Fool? Why is Isabella silent?), or on cultural, dramaturgical, cinematic, theoretical and editorial issues. How do actors, directors and editors deal with the inevitable gap between players and performers? How do biases and the historical treatment of Shakespeare reflect and affect appreciation? How have biographers dealt with Shakespeare’s early years?

Abstracts or proposals are due by June 4, 2010 (early decision) or August 27th (final deadline). All inquiries should be directed to: Russ Bodi/ English Department/PO Box 10,000/Toledo, OH 43699-1947 or e-mail  russell_bodi@owens.edu. E-mail abstracts to marilee_motto@owens.edu. Please include academic affiliation, if any, and status: independent, faculty, grad student, or undergrad.

Plenary Address: Katherine E. Maus, Author, Inwardness and Theater in the English Renaissance, Four Revenge Tragedies of the English Renaissance, Soliciting Interpretation: Literary Theory and Seventeenth-Century Poetry, (ed. with Elizabeth Harvey), and Ben Jonson and the Roman Frame of Mind.

National Players will present a live performance of A Midsummer Night’s Dream. “America’s longest running classical touring company, has now reached its 60th consecutive season of touring.”

Toledo Repertory Theater’s Staged Reading of A Merry Regiment of Women. Six of Shakespeare’s women discuss the availability and quality of women’s roles in Shakespeare’s plays.

OVSC invites graduate and undergraduate students to compete for the M. R. Smith Prize. Conference proceedings are published in a juried, online journal.

Visit our website (which will soon be updated):  http://www.marietta.edu/~engl/OVSC/