Monthly Archives: August 2010

Ashland — Shakespeare Authorship Conference Schedule (Sept. 16-19, 2010)

Thought folks might want to see some additional details about the upcoming Shakespeare Authorship Conference schedule.  You can register online for the Shakespeare Fellowship/Shakespeare Oxford Society’s  SF/SOS Annual Conference — Sept. 16-19, 2010 in Ashland, Oregon at the online registration site: http://www.goestores.com/catalog.aspx?Merchant=shakespeareoxfordsociety

Shakespeare Fellowship
and Shakespeare Oxford Society

2010 Conference Schedule

On-site registration check-in will begin at 9:00 AM on September 16, and the education program will begin at 10:00 AM.

Conference registration includes an opening reception with appetizers on the 16th, buffet lunches on day two and three, and the annual awards banquet at the conclusion of the conference on the afternoon of the 19th.

Saturday afternoon will be dedicated to performances with music provided by the lute duet Mignarda, Ron Andrico and Donna Stewart, creators of My Lord of Oxenford’s Maske. OSF all-star Robin Goodrin-Nordli will present her original show, Bard Babes, and Keir Cutler will give an encore performance of his adaptation of Mark Twain’s satire, Is Shakespeare Dead? The afternoon will conclude with a signing ceremony for the ‘Declaration of Reasonable Doubt’.

Thursday: September 16

Music by Mignarda with Ron Andrico and Donna Stewart
Prof Tom Gage: The Bone in the Elephant’s Heart
Dr. Tom Hunter: The Invention of the Human in Shylock 
Dr. Earl Showerman: Shakespeare’s Shylock and the Strange Case of Gaspar Ribeiro
Cheryl Eagan-Donovan: Shakespeare’s Ideal: Sexuality and Gender Identity in The Merchant of Venice
Dr. Marty Hyatt: Teaching Heavy Ignorance Aloft to Fly
Conference Opening Reception – Ashland Springs Hotel Conservatory & Garden
Merchant of Venice at OSF Elizabethan Theatre

Friday: September 17

Shakespeare Fellowship Annual Meeting
Richard Whalen: ‘Goats and Monkeys!’ Othello’s Outburst Recalls a Fresco in Bassano, Italy
Dr. Frank Davis: The “Unlearned” versus the “Learned” Shakespeare
Prof Jack Shuttleworth: Hamlet and Its Mysteries: An Oxfordian Editor’s View
Merchant of Venice Panel: Tom Hunter, Tom Regnier & OSF Actors
Bill Rauch: Artistic Director of OSF and Director of Hamlet and Merchant of Venice
Prof Roger Stritmatter: The “Little Eyases” and the “Innovation” of 1589
Katherine Chiljan: Twelve “Too Early” Allusions to Shakespeare’s Hamlet
Tom Regnier: Hamlet’s Law
Prof Sam Saunders: The Odds on Hamlet’s Odds
Prof Helen Gordon: The Symbols in Hamlet: An Oxfordian Interpretation
Hamlet at OSF Bowmer Theatre

Saturday: September 18

Shakespeare-Oxford Society Annual Meeting
Hank Whittemore: The Birth and Growth of Prince Hal: Why did Oxford write The Famous Victories of Henry the Fifth?
Marie Merkel – “In the Fit of Miming”: A brief history of Sir John Falstaffe and the “whole school of tongues” in his belly
Lynne Kositsky: The Young Adult Novel Minerva’s Voyage and its Relationship to True Reportory and Minerva Britanna
Hamlet panel: Prof Ren Draya, Jack Shuttleworth & OSF Actors
Music by Mignarda
Robin Goodrin Nordli: Bard Babes
Keir Cutler: Is Shakespeare Dead?
“Declaration of Reasonable Doubt” Signing Ceremony with John Shahan, Paul Nicholson, Executive Director at OSF, and other signatories
1 Henry IV at OSF Elizabethan Theatre

Sunday: September 19

William Ray: Proofs of Oxfordian Authorship in the Shakespearean Apocrypha
Bonner Cutting: Let the Punishment Fit the Crime
John Hamill – Bisexuality, Bastardy, Avisa and Antonio Perez Revisited
Michael Cecil: Revisiting the 1st Baron Burghley’s Precepts for the Well Ordering and Carriage of a Man’s Life
Henry IV Panel: Felicia Londré & OSF Actors
2010 Annual Joint Conference Awards Banquet

For further information write to the local coordinator at earlees@charter.net

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This Just In — From the NY Times: Scholars Test Web Alternative to Peer Review

Friends … thought this article in today’s NY Times would be of interest.  It’s about the impact of the web on traditional peer review practices.  Interesting that Shakespeare Quarterly has been in the vanguard of opening up the peer review process.  Link to the full article and a few clips from the article below.  Matthew

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/08/24/arts/24peer.html

SNIP

That transformation was behind the recent decision by the prestigious 60-year-old Shakespeare Quarterly to embark on an uncharacteristic experiment in the forthcoming fall issue — one that will make it, Ms. Rowe says, the first traditional humanities journal to open its reviewing to the World Wide Web.

Mixing traditional and new methods, the journal posted online four essays not yet accepted for publication, and a core group of experts — what Ms. Rowe called “our crowd sourcing” — were invited to post their signed comments on the Web site MediaCommons, a scholarly digital network. Others could add their thoughts as well, after registering with their own names. In the end 41 people made more than 350 comments, many of which elicited responses from the authors. The revised essays were then reviewed by the quarterly’s editors, who made the final decision to include them in the printed journal, due out Sept. 17.

The Shakespeare Quarterly trial, along with a handful of other trailblazing digital experiments, goes to the very nature of the scholarly enterprise. Traditional peer review has shaped the way new research has been screened for quality and then how it is communicated; it has defined the border between the public and an exclusive group of specialized experts.

SNIP

The most daunting obstacle to opening up the process is that peer-review publishing is the path to a job and tenure, and no would-be professor wants to be the academic canary in the coal mine.

The first question that Alan Galey, a junior faculty member at the University of Toronto, asked when deciding to participate in The Shakespeare Quarterly’s experiment was whether his essay would ultimately count toward tenure. “I went straight to the dean with it,” Mr. Galey said. (It would.)

Although initially cautious, Mr. Galey said he is now “entirely won over by the open peer review model.” The comments were more extensive and more insightful, he said, than he otherwise would have received on his essay, which discusses Shakespeare in the context of information theory.

Derran Charlton’s Tribute to Professor Michael Brame

Derran Charlton wrote the following tribute to Professor Michael Brame.  It was first published on Nina Green’s Phaeton listserv and is reprinted here with the permission of the author.  Matthew

Nina, et al:

Your sad news relating to the death of professor Michael Brame comes as a terrible shock to all Oxfordians. Michael was deeply versed in the sciences and the arts. He had been a constant source of inspiration and encouragement.
My heartfelt sorrow goes out to Galina and their children.
Michael was most generous in all that he did. I gladly recall that he unhesitatingly and successfully recommended me as a Reader at the Bodleian.
I first met both professors Michael and Galina in Carmel many years ago, and was truly amazed when they told me that between them they were fluent in 40 languages. They kindly invited me to speak to their students during the coming days, but sadly I could not take advantage of their kindness as I was immediately en route to Washington D.C. Their knowledge of Tudor England -especially Oxford- was beyond comparison.
One of my all-time favorite Oxfordian books is Michael and Galina`s Shakespeare`s Fingerprints. The generous reviews included:
`The arguments are cogent and ought to go a long way towards convincing the general public, or at least that part that cares about authorship attribution`. Professor Jack Hoeksema, University of Groningen, Holland.
`The arguments are very clear, cohesive and convincing. Made me feel like reading more`.
Professor Yasukuni Takano, University of Nagasaki, Japan.
`This is huge!` Professor Sharon Hargus, University of Washington.
`A work of linguistic love!` Professor Rafael Escribano, Puerto Rico.
Michael taught in North America, Europe, Asia, and Africa and had been a professor at the University of Washington for more than three decades. He is the author of several technical books and the editor of Linguistic Analysis, a linguistic periodical with international circulation.
Galina Popova is a professional linguist and affiliate professor at the University of Washington. She studied language and literature at the Leningrad State University in the former Soviet Union and received her Ph.D. in the U.S.
In true sadness.
Derran (Charlton)

In Memoriam: Robert Sean Brazil 1955-2010

I’m sure that many readers of the SOS Online News would want to know about this.  Barb Flues has created a tribute page for our inimitable friend and colleague Robert Sean Brazil on www.elizabethanauthors.com — the invaluable website Barb and Robert created and maintained together.  Here is the touching note Barb posted on the website announcing Robert’s untimely passing.  Many thanks for doing this Barb.   Matthew

I am saddened to report the death of Robbie Brazil, co-partner in the Elizabethan Authors web site. A born jester, but no fool, he wore his motley with the pride of one who believes in his mission; a born teacher but no pedant, he helped others to bring out the best in themselves. As the web site grows, he will be deeply missed.

Robbie was beyond description, but the following messages will give you an idea of what his friendship meant to some of those who knew him best.

Barb Flues

Angela Michelle’s Hubpages Article about Shakespeare Authorship Issue

Just calling your attention to this interesting article on Hubpages about the authorship issue and Edward de Vere.  Scroll down and you’ll find a survey question.  Scroll down even further and there’s a video of Mark Anderson’s TV interview about his book Shakespeare By Another Name.  Worth watching!  Matthew

Here’s the link:  http://hubpages.com/hub/Did-Shakespeare-Really-Write-His-Own-Stuff

William Shakespeare and The Authorship Debate: Did He Really Write His Own Stuff

// //

William Shakespeareis one of the most famous names of all time, due to his tremendous success as a playwright and poet. In fact, his success seems so incredible that many skeptics question the authorship of his sonnets and plays. Although a majority believe he was a legendary playwright and actor from Stratford-upon-Avon who was christened William Shakespeare. Others theorize that Shakespeare is actually a pseudonym for a group of playwrights. There are many theories in between, which name various men, such as Edward Bacon or Christopher Marlowe, as the true William Shakespeare. One of the more common beliefs is that the true authorof the Shakespearean works is Edward de Vere, the Earl of Oxford. He is believed to have used “William Shakespeare” as a pseudonym to mask his true identity. Evidence for this theory is based on the lack of evidence for Shakespearethe playwright, the credentials of the Earl of Oxford, and the similarities between the Shakespearean characters and Edward de Vere’s life.(Read More) 

 

 

The Ashland Authorship Conference — September 16-19, 2010

Plans for this year’s Shakespeare Authorship Conference (in Ashland, OR) are proceeding apace.  Here’s some info and a link to get more details.  You can register online via this link: 

http://www.goestores.com/catalog.aspx?Merchant=shakespeareoxfordsociety&DeptID=170579

The Shakespeare Oxford Society and The Shakespeare Fellowship Society

 Present

The Ashland Authorship Conference

September 16-19, 2010
Ashland Springs Hotel and Oregon Shakespeare Festival

The sixth annual joint authorship conference of the Shakespeare Fellowship and the Shakespeare Oxford Society will take place in Ashland, Oregon from September 16-19, 2010. This year the conference will focus on the plays in production at the Tony Award winning Oregon Shakespeare Festival, which is celebrating its 75th anniversary this year. Group tickets have been secured for the conference for three productions at OSF: The Merchant of Venice, Hamlet and 1 Henry IV.

The conference will convene at the Ashland Springs Hotel. Already a number of outstanding scholars, authors and theatre professionals have committed to presenting at Ashland, including Professors Daniel Wright, Felicia Londre, Ren Draya, Roger Stritmatter, and Chris Duval. OSF Artistic Director Bill Rauch and Executive Director Paul Nicholson will both address the conference, and Robin Goodrin-Nordli will perform her comedic Shakespeare heroine composite, Bard Babes. Keir Cutler will present his wonderfully satiric production, Is Shakespeare Dead? and award-winning musicians Ron Andrico and Donna Stewart, who produced My Lord of Oxenford’s Masque, will also perform their music during the authorship conference.

Other presenters will include OSF’s James Newcomb, Tom Regnier on Hamlet’s law, Bonner Cutting on Shakspere’s Will, Bill Farina and Tom Hunter on The Merchant of Venice, Michael Cecil on Lord Burghley, plus Hank Whittemore, John Hamill, Paul Altrocchi, Richard Whalen, Frank Davis, Katherine Chiljan, Ramon Jimenez, Earl Showerman, John Shahan, Marie Merkel, Sam Saunders, William Ray, and Cheryl Eagan-Donovan. The conference will feature panel discussions with OSF actors after each show and include a signing ceremony of the Declaration of Reasonable Doubt.

(More Details)

http://www.shakespeare-oxford.com/?p=138